Monthly Archives: September 2014

Florida Community Health Coalition- 4th Annual Summit Sept 2014

FLORIDA COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER (CHW) COALITION  4th ANNUAL SUMMIT
OUR TIME IS NOW! LINKING CARE, COMMUNITIES, COMPASSION & CAREERS
Holiday Inn Orlando International Airport, Orlando, Florida

September 25-26, 2014
Objectives for the Summit:
 Demonstrate the diversity of the Florida CHW Coalition
 Provide opportunities for networking to strengthen abilities to work together at the regional level throughout the year
 Examine how CHWs fit across the health care spectrum and into the changing landscape of health care delivery
 Provide an update on the CHW statewide certification process
 Review structure, model and mission of CHW Coalition and develop a plan for sustainability
 Conduct leadership skills training for CHWs

THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 25, 2014: COALITION STRATEGIC PLANNING
9:00-9:30am Registration, International A&B
9:30-10:00 Introductions, Welcoming Remarks, International A&B Brendaly Rodriguez, MA and Patria Alguila, Co-Chairs
10:00-11:00 What We Have Accomplished, Year in Review, International A&B DVD, Overview and Discussion from Sub-Group Leads (member input encouraged) Subgroup Leads Overview,

  • Steering Brendaly Rodriguez, Patria Alguila, Marion Banzhaf
  • Curriculum & Practice Cheryl Kerr, Martha Hicks, Sornia Joseph
  • Networking/Sustainability Kamaria Laffrey, Melissa Thibodeau
  • Policy Denise Kerwin
  • Regional Networking Brendaly Rodriguez, Lolita Dash-Pitts

11:15-12:15pm Mission, vision, and structure review, International A&B
12:30-1:15 Lunch – Regional Networking and Planning , Lobby
1:30-2:45 Planning SMART(ER) Objectives, Sustainability Planning
3:00-4:00 Continue Planning/Prepare discussion for Friday
4:00-4:30 Wrap up for Day
6:00 Awards Dinner

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2014
8:30-9:00am Registration for newcomers, Foyer of International A&B
9:00-10:00 PLENARY: Strategic Direction for the Florida CHW Coalition and the CHW Field, International A&B

Review of Strategic Planning Session: Steve Shelton, Brendaly Rodriguez, Patria Alguila, moderators
10:00-10:15 Break
10:15-11:00 PLENARY: Progress on Creating a Pathway for Statewide Certification, International A&B Amy Farrington, Neal McGarry, Florida Certification Board
Marion Banzhaf, Brendaly Rodriguez, moderators
11:15- 12:30 Workshops (choose one)
Training CHWs: Enhancing Skills – Using Popular Education-

  • Colleen Reinert, MHP,
  • Patria Alguila, moderator

Developing Community Advocacy Skills

  • Leah Barber-Heinz, Florida CHAIN
  • Sornia Joseph, Moderator

Becoming a Person of Influence

  • Julé Colvin
  • Lolita Dash-Pitts, moderator

12:45-1:45 Lunch, Lobby

Concurrent Feedback Session of CHW Guide (limited to 12 bilingual pre-registrants), Location

2:00 -3:15 pm Workshops

Roundtable: CHWs and Participatory Community Based and Clinical Settings Research
Valentine Cesar, Cynthia Lebrón, Shelia McCann, and Brendaly Rodríguez, moderator

Roundtable: Supervising CHWs, Essential Elements for Good Relationships
Lucila Lopez, Florida Hospital, others TBD, Patria Alguila, moderator

Grant Writing and Sustainability
Julé Colvin, Lisa Hamilton, moderator

3:30-4:45 Afternoon Plenary & Closing: Our Time is Now! Moving Forward

Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Thanks to the Summit Planning Committee: Patria Alguila, Marion Banzhaf, Lolita Dash-Pitts, Sean Dickerson, Susan Fleming, Cheryl Kerr, Natali Ramirez, Brendaly Rodriguez, Sornia Joseph, Lisa Hamilton, Maria-Teresa de Cespedes, Melissa Thibodeau, Kamaria Laffrey, Colleen Reinert, the CHW Coalition Steering Committee, Health Council of South Florida, and to everyone else who committed time and energy to make this Summit a success! Thanks also to Heather Pilcher, Blue Spark Event Design.

CHW~LINK September 25, 2014

CHW~LINK September 25, 2014

CDC Policy Evidence Assessment Report: Community Health Worker Policy Components(September 2014; 13 Pages) http://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/pubs/docs/chw_evidence_assessment_report.pdf

CDC CHW Policy 20140002

 

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PREVENTION AND WELLNESS SHOWCASE

October 1st 2014

 4:00pm – 6:00pm

SRJC Bertolini Student Center , SRJC Santa Rosa ,CA

Event Info:

Stephanie Merrida Grant chw4life@gmail.com

Carol West carolwestchw@gmail.com

JOB Openings Catholic Charities Sonoma County CA

Catholic Charities has several job openings right now. There are multiple Street Outreach Worker positions available so hoping that this will appeal to the CHW. Also, as I mentioned, we are really trying to hire individuals with a lived experience.

http://srcharities.org/employment/current-openings.html

_____________________________
Melissa Struzzo, MPH
707-542-5426, ext. 219
mstruzzo@srcharities.org

 

 

 

The Johns Hopkins University Division of Health Sciences Informatics Study Calls for 20 CHW Groups to Participate

The Johns Hopkins University Division of Health Sciences Informatics been funded (R24 HS022073) by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to evaluate the relative value of a variety of information resources for Community Health Workers (CHWs), including links to community resources, “library” resources explaining the evidence for different actions CHWs may take, protocols or templates of actions to take, and answers provided by other CHWs for questions that come up in the course of their daily work.

The study itself calls for 20 CHW groups to participate. Each group would receive computer tablets for the participating CHWs, who would be assigned to one of two design versions for using the information resources. The study will be for one year, slated to start early in 2015.

If you are interested in considering participating, please contact either Dr. Harold Lehmann (lehmann@jhmi.edu) or Dr. M. Chris Gibbons (mgibbons@jhsph.edu).

 

 Global Evidence for Peer Support: Humanizing Health Care (44pgs Report from an International Conference Hosted by Peers for Progress and the National Council of La Raza June 2014 http://peersforprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/140911-global-evidence-for-peer-support-humanizing-health-care.pdf

“We all do better with peer support”
“Peer Support works and people like it”

NEHI Oct 20 20140001

http://www.nehi.net/events/58-community-health-workers-getting-the-job-done-in-health-care-delivery/view

Sarah Lopez ; Senior Comprehensive Project ; Professors Matsuoka & Shamasunder  April 2014

Executive Summary

Individuals dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid, known as “dual eligibles,” represent one of the most vulnerable populations under the purview of America’s public insurance programs. Characterized by advanced age and functional limitations, dual eligibles present complex health care needs that have historically been mismanaged by the separate Medicare and Medicaid entities. Recent legislation at the federal and state levels introduced new policy opportunities for Medicare-Medicaid integration. California’s integration effort is known as Cal MediConnect.

In California, the dual eligible population is linguistically and culturally diverse, which presents both challenges and opportunities for the implementation of Cal MediConnect, including the need for culturally competent care. Community health workers, non-licensed members of the community that act as a bridge between the formal health care system and community members, may be able to meet this need. As members of the marginalized communities they serve and as a labor force that emerged in the shadow of the formal health care systems, community health workers themselves are also vulnerable. This paper proposes a partnership between the dual eligible population of Los Angeles County and the CHW labor force, mediated by the emerging care delivery and financing systems for dual eligibles in Los Angeles County. Interviews with members of various stakeholder sectors revealed a lack of communication between CHWs and health plans, the potential use of CHWs as enrollment counselors or as a part of interdisciplinary care teams, and the difficulty and unlikelihood of CHW inclusion in formal health care systems under Cal MediConnect.

Recommendations include CHW initiated communication with health plans, coalition building, and lobbying efforts on the part of CHWs.

 

Threading the Needle: Strategies to Elevate the Role of Community Health Workers in Emerging Models of Care for Dual Eligibles

Threading the Needle: Strategies to Elevate the Role of Community Health Workers in Emerging Models of Care for Dual Eligibles

Executive Summary

Individuals dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid, known as “dual eligibles,” represent some of the most vulnerable populations under the purview of America’s public insurance programs. Characterized by advanced age and functional limitations, dual eligibles
present complex health care needs that have historically been mismanaged by the separate Medicare and Medicaid entities. Recent legislation at the federal and state levels introduced new policy opportunities for Medicare-Medicaid integration. California’s integration effort is known as Cal MediConnect.

In California, the dual eligible population is linguistically and culturally diverse, which presents both challenges and opportunities for the implementation of Cal MediConnect, including the need for culturally competent care. Community health workers, non-licensed members of the community that act as a bridge between the formal health care system and community members, may be able to meet this need. As members of the marginalized communities they serve and as a labor force that emerged in the shadow of the formal health care systems, community health workers themselves are also vulnerable. This paper proposes a partnership between the dual eligible population of Los Angeles County and the CHW labor force, mediated by the emerging care delivery and financing systems
for dual eligibles in Los Angeles County. Interviews with members of various stakeholder sectors revealed a lack of communication between CHWs and health plans, the potential use of CHWs as enrollment counselors or as a part of interdisciplinary care teams, and the difficulty and unlikelihood of CHW inclusion in formal health care systems under Cal MediConnect. Recommendations include CHW initiated communication with health plans, coalition building, and lobbying efforts on the part of CHWs.

Read More:  http://www.oxy.edu/sites/default/files/assets/UEP/Comps/2014/Lopez,Sarah_Thr eading%20the%20Needle.pdf

Closing the Loop: Why We Need to Invest—and Reinvest—in Prevention

Closing the Loop: Why We Need to Invest—and Reinvest—in Prevention ( 6 pages Discussion Paper)

Download: Download PDF – 189 KB
Published: September 9, 2014
Type: Discussion Paper
Topic(s): Public Health
Author(s)*: Larry Cohen, Anthony Iton

Discussion Paper

Larry CohenLarry Cohen

*The authors are participants in the activities of the IOM Roundtable on Population Health Improvement


Note: The views expressed in discussion papers are those of the authors and not necessarily of the authors’ organizations or of the IOM. Discussion papers are intended to help inform and stimulate discussion. They have not been subjected to the review procedures of the IOM and are not reports of the IOM or of the National Research Council.

In their discussion paper, Cohen and Iton propose a sustainable model for funding prevention strategies. The authors describe how the state of California used the $2.4 billion revenue generated from cigarette taxes from 1989 to 2008 to fund tobacco control programs to reduce smoking. A recent analysis suggests the state saved $134 billion – a 5,500 percent return on investment – from the reduction in medical expenditures that would have been required to treat smoking-related illnesses, yet little of that money has gone into prevention programs. Taking the $134 billion savings as an example, the authors discuss how their model of “closing the loop” to consistently fund prevention programs using taxes, fines, and fees on behaviors such as smoking and drinking combined with other sources would serve the goal of reducing national health care expenditures, currently nearly a trillion dollars. By pooling and managing prevention funds from federal, state, and local sources, philanthropies, and others based on population needs, and investing in evidence-informed strategies in communities, the prevention system continuously captures and reinvests savings through intermediary organizations that support the development of community strategies to improve health, reduce costs, and the need for additional health care, thereby creating a virtuous cycle of investment before people are sick or injured. The authors note that effectively “closing the loop” will depend on successful multi-sector partnerships and collaborations with the broad understanding that not all investments bring a greater return than the expense, but there is an urgent need to save lives and reduce misery now and into the future.     Read the Discussion Paper >>

Community Health Workers: Part of the Solution for Advancing Health Equity; Perspectives and Initiatives from the Pacific and Southwest Regional Health Equity Council (Region IX)

Community Health Workers: Part of the Solution for Advancing Health Equity; Perspectives and Initiatives from the Pacific and Southwest Regional Health Equity Council (Region IX) The Pacific and Southwest Regional Health Equity Council (Region IX) and ASTHO are held a webinar which addressed case studies that have demonstrated the value and impact of community health workers (CHWs) on health disparities and how this documented value of CHWs can assist in educating and informing the work of policymakers, payers, and other critical audiences. The webinar highlights Region IX/RHEC’s focus on CHWs role in enhancing health equity and addressing the social determinants of health, discusses the history and current landscape of CHW practices in the region’s states and territories, and discusses recommendations on how to build and sustain a regional system of support for CHWs and organizations that utilize CHWs. Slides will be made available at http://www.astho.org/t/event.aspx?eventid=11083

Webinar Objectives:

  • To highlight Region IX/RHEC’s focus on CHWs role in enhancing health equity and addressing the social determinants of health.
  • To discuss the history and current landscape of CHW practices in the region’s states and territories.
  • To discuss recommendations on how to build and sustain a regional system of support for CHWs and organizations that utilize CHWs.

Moderator

Shene’ Bowie-Onye, DrPH, ACSM-HFS

Executive Director, California Healthy Kids and After School Resource Centers

Alameda County Office of Education

 

Speakers

 

  • Anna Alonzo, Office Chief for Chronic Disease for the Arizona Department of Health Services
  • Emma Torres, Executive Director of Campesinos Sin Fronteras

Community Health Workers Help Control Diabetes, Yale Study Finds

Community Health Workers Help Control Diabetes, Yale Study Finds AUGUST 21, 2014

A new NIH-funded study led by the Yale School of Public Health shows the effectiveness of a peer-counseling program integrated within the health care management team in helping the Latino community control blood glucose levels and improve diabetes management…to read more…  http://www.aspph.org/community-health-workers-help-control-diabetes-yale-study-finds/