Monthly Archives: August 2014

Free, online, self-paced, evidence-based CHW and Instructor trainings on fall prevention among older adults

 Fall Prevention among Older Adults

One out of three adults ages 65+ older fall each year, and  falls are the leading cause of injury death in this age group (National Council on Aging & Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute, 2010). Community Health Workers/Promotores have the unique opportunity to work with older adults to reduce risk factors for falling and prevent injury due to falls. To equip CHWs/Ps in fall prevention, the Center for Community Health Development’s National CHW Training Center at the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Prevention Research Center developed an in-person and online curriculum for CHWs/Ps and CHW/P instructors.

We are pleased to announce the availability of these free, online, self-paced, evidence-based CHW and Instructor trainings on fall prevention among older adults. (Note: the trainings are approved for Texas DSHS-certified CHW and CHW Instructor CEUs).

1.               CHW Course: Preparing CHWs/Promotores to Prevent and Reduce Falls Among Older Adults (2 Texas DSHS-certified CHW CEUs), register at http://www.aheconnect.com/cgec/

2.               CHW Instructor Course*: Helping older adults change their health behaviors to prevent falls and related Injuries: Health Behavior Change Theories (5 Texas DSHS-certified CHW Instructor CEUs), register athttp://nchwtc.tamhsc.edu/fall-prevention-curriculum/

For more information about the training, curriculum, or in-person trainings, please call 979-845-6462 or email CHW-Training@sph.tamhsc.edu.

Please feel free to forward this email, flyers, and information to your CHW/Promotora and CHW Instructor contacts about two free, online, self-paced courses on fall prevention among older adults.

 

 

CHW~LINK 8.25.2014

CHW~LINK  8.25.2014

The Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers  (MACHW) Summer Updates: Board of Certification of CHWs

The Board of Certification of Community Health Workers continues to meet on the 2ndTuesday of the month (unless otherwise noted) from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm at the Division of Health Professions Licensure, 239 Causeway St, Boston (near North Station T stop) in Conference Rooms 417 A&B. The meeting dates for 2014 are posted on the Board’swebsite.

As some of you may have been following, ten core competencies for CHWs have been proposed as follows:

  1. Outreach Methods and Strategies
  2. Individual and Community Assessment
  3. Effective Communication
  4. Cultural Responsiveness and Mediation
  5. Education to Promote Healthy Behavior Change
  6. Care Coordination and System Navigation
  7. Use of Public Health Concepts and Approaches
  8. Advocacy and Community Capacity Building
  9. Documentation
  10. Professional Skills and Conduct

In addition, much discussion has taken place around the two individual pathways to certification. One pathway being explored will be for CHWs with work experience only (no approved core competency training). Under this pathway, it is proposed that individuals would be “grandfathered” in and the pathway will expire after a sunset period. The 2nd pathway proposed will be tailored for CHWs with both work experience and CHW core competency training. Both pathways would require an ethics exam (standards of conduct for CHWs) — a draft and discussion around this has begun.

Other topics of discussion have included the requirements for CHWs certified as trainers. Although this piece is not final, the Board is looking at this as a career advancement opportunity for CHWs. It is required now that the Board provide this tier. It is proposed that this would create a board-approved CHW with the goal of certifying a CHW as a trainer (not to be confused with a CHW trainer).

Texas Healthcare Transformation and Quality Improvement Program Medicaid 1115 Waiver  (UTMB Health)  Donna Sollenberger  EVP, CEO Health System February 2012 http://www.utmb.edu/1115/docs/1115Waiver-CommunityPresentation-2012-02-21.pdf

ASTHO and the Pacific and Southwest Regional Health Equity Council to Hold Webinar on Community Health Workers

On Sept. 3 from 4-5 p.m. EDT, ( 1pm – 2pm Pacific ) ASTHO and the Pacific and Southwest Regional Health Equity Council (Region IX) will hold the webinar “Community Health Workers: Part of the Solution for Advancing Health Equity; Perspectives and Initiatives from the Pacific and Southwest Regional Health Equity Council (Region IX).” The webinar will address case studies that demonstrate the value and impact of community health workers (CHWs) on health disparities and how the documented value of CHWs can assist in educating and informing the work of policymakers, payers, and other critical audiences. The webinar will highlight Region IX focus on CHWs’ role in enhancing health equity and addressing the social determinants of health. The webinar will also highlight the history and current landscape of CHW practices in the region’s states and territories, and discuss recommendations on how to build and sustain a regional system of support for CHWs and organizations that utilize CHWs.

Marissa Scalia Sucosky, MPH
Project Officer  Blackberry: 404-384-9135   msucosky@cdc.gov

Program Development and Implementation Branch
Division of Community Health
National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
4770 Buford Highway, NE, MS F-81 Atlanta, GA 30341

 

Health Affairs Blog has posted a new item: Health Policy Brief: The Relative Contribution Of Multiple Determinants To Health Outcomes‘ by Tracy Gnadinger

A new Health Policy Brief from Health Affairs and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) examines factors that can contribute to health status. In the United States, less than 9 percent of health expenditures go to disease prevention, and there is little support for social services, such as programs for older adults, housing, and employment programs.

This brief focuses on “multiple determinant” studies that seek to quantify the relative influence of some of these factors on health. It is part of a larger project, supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which aims to create a structure for conducting analyses that demonstrate the value of investments in nonclinical primary prevention and their impact on health care costs.  You may view the latest post at http://healthaffairs.org/blog/2014/08/22/health-policy-brief-the-relative-contribution-of-multiple-determinants-to-health-outcomes/    Health Affairs  blog@healthaffairs.org

 

CMS Beneficiary Engagement, Incentives, and Behavioral Insights Request for Information (RFI) 08/19/2014  The announcement and response form are at:  http://www.healthcarecommunities.org/Home/RFI-BeneficiaryEngagement.aspx

Request for Information on Beneficiary Engagement, Incentives, and Behavioral Insights

AGENCY:  Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), DHHS

ACTION:  Request for Information (RFI)

SUMMARY

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) are seeking input on the following areas related to potential initiatives to test innovative models to increase the engagement of Medicare beneficiaries, Medicaid beneficiaries, Medicare-Medicaid beneficiaries, and/or Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) beneficiaries in their health and health care.  By “engagement,” we mean beneficiaries’ active involvement in behaviors and activities meant to improve their health status and outcomes.

We are especially interested in models that use evidence-based social and behavioral insights to improve beneficiary engagement.  We are interested in interventions and engagement that utilize methods from behavioral economics, social psychology, incentive design, and other methods to attract attention of beneficiaries, encourage enrollment in the models, and provide continued motivation for the beneficiary to continue to engage in the model to improve health and healthcare activities.

CMS anticipates publishing a separate request for information (RFI) to solicit ideas related to Medicare Parts C and D, Medigap organizations, Medicaid, Medicare-Medicaid beneficiaries, or CHIP managed care, and information related to value-based insurance design (VBID).  In this current RFI, we are interested in suggestions from all parties, including beneficiaries and beneficiary advocates, insurers, managed care plans, and employers related to how incentives and behavioral insights may help to improve beneficiary engagement, but anticipate that models that are considered in connection with this RFI will not include VBID issues.

DATES:  Comment Date:  To be assured consideration, comments must be received by 11:59 p.m. on September 15, 2014.

FORMAT:  All comments submitted must be typed into the text boxes, put in Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF file formats. CMS will not accept hard copy responses. Responses to this request are voluntary. Response to each question should be limited to 200 words or less. Total responses to the entire RFI should be 2,500 words or less, double spaced.

ADDRESSES:  Comments should be submitted electronically through the CMS Innovation Center’s web page at:  http://innovation.cms.gov/initiatives/Beneficiary-Engagement/

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:  BenEngage@cms.hhs.gov with “RFI” in the subject line.

BACKGROUND

Section 1115A of the Social Security Act, as added by section 3021 of the Affordable Care Act, authorizes the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (Innovation Center) to test innovative payment and service delivery models that have the potential to reduce program expenditures while preserving or enhancing the quality of care for Medicare, Medicaid, Medicare-Medicaid, and CHIP beneficiaries.  CMS is interested in testing new models that will encourage beneficiaries’ engagement in their health and health care in order to create improved care, better health, and lower costs.  These models would complement CMS’s existing portfolio of models that use innovative methods to increase beneficiary engagement.  (For more information on the Innovation Center’s models, please see http://innovation.cms.gov.) CMS is issuing this RFI to obtain comments on the selection and design of models to improve beneficiary engagement in their health and health care.

Questions: This RFI seeks responses from clinicians, clinician practices, healthcare institutions, Medicaid/CHIP agencies, external quality review organizations, quality improvement organizations, advocacy organizations, health plans, employers, purchasers, consumers, research and policy groups, Medicaid/CHIP agencies, external quality review organizations, community-based providers and other members of the public about how to improve engagement of CMS beneficiaries in health care in order to generate better care and better health at lower costs.  The comments sent in response to the RFI may be used to develop future requests for proposals to test new models to improve CMS beneficiary engagement in their health and health care.

Commenters are requested to provide responses to the following questions.  Please respond to those questions that are germane to your experience and expertise.  A response to every question is not required.

Invitation to participate in a survey to learn how CHWs support patients who have high blood pressure

Invitation to participate in a nationwide survey and interview to learn more about ways CHWs support patients who have high blood pressure

Dear Community Health Worker,

Emory University is conducting a survey of Community Health Workers nationwide. The purpose of the survey is to learn more about ways CHWs support patients who have high blood pressure. Results from this survey will be used to help address gaps in literature about the ways CHWs help patients with high blood pressure and also give you a chance to share your experience as a member of the care team.

Your support and participation is important to help us reach a diverse group of CHWs. You are the experts, and we want to hear from you! The survey has multiple choice and short answer questions and is should not take longer than 25 minutes. The survey is completely anonymous and no identifying information will be collected or reported for this survey. All participation is voluntary.  Individual information will not be used in reports or documents.

In order to take the survey, you must be:  a CHW, over the age of 18, and speak English.

If you are willing to take the survey and contribute to our knowledge about CHWs, please click here https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CHWHypertension or copy and paste the URL into your web browser. At the end of the survey you will be asked if you’re interested in participating in an interview. If you would like to talk more about your work as a CHW, please click “Yes” to let us know and a member of our team will be in touch.

Thank you for your participation in this survey. Your contribution will be of great benefit to the CHW community. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Emory University at 614-554-5298 or caitlin.allen@emory.edu.

Thank you, Caitlin Allen;  Principal Investigator

Massachusetts Board of Certification of Community Health Workers Propose Ten Core Competencies for CHWs

Massachusetts  Board of Certification of Community Health Workers Propose Ten Core Competencies for CHWs

The Massachusetts Association of Community Health Workers  (MACHW)

Summer Updates: Board of Certification of CHWs

The Board of Certification of Community Health Workers continues to meet on the 2nd Tuesday of the month (unless otherwise noted) from 9:00 am – 12:00 pm at the Division of Health Professions Licensure, 239 Causeway St, Boston (near North Station T stop) in Conference Rooms 417 A&B. The meeting dates for 2014 are posted on the Board’s website.

As some of you may have been following, ten core competencies for CHWs have been proposed as follows:

  1. Outreach Methods and Strategies
  2. Individual and Community Assessment
  3. Effective Communication
  4. Cultural Responsiveness and Mediation
  5. Education to Promote Healthy Behavior Change
  6. Care Coordination and System Navigation
  7. Use of Public Health Concepts and Approaches
  8. Advocacy and Community Capacity Building
  9. Documentation
  10. Professional Skills and Conduct

In addition, much discussion has taken place around the two individual pathways to certification. One pathway being explored will be for CHWs with work experience only (no approved core competency training). Under this pathway, it is proposed that individuals would be “grandfathered” in and the pathway will expire after a sunset period. The 2nd pathway proposed will be tailored for CHWs with both work experience and CHW core competency training. Both pathways would require an ethics exam (standards of conduct for CHWs) — a draft and discussion around this has begun.

Other topics of discussion have included the requirements for CHWs certified as trainers. Although this piece is not final, the Board is looking at this as a career advancement opportunity for CHWs. It is required now that the Board provide this tier. It is proposed that this would create a board-approved CHW with the goal of certifying a CHW as a trainer (not to be confused with a CHW trainer).

The board’s next meeting is scheduled for Tues., September 9, 2014 at 250 Washington St. – Public Health Council Room, 2nd Floor, Side A, from 9am-12pm and is open to the public. We encourage anyone with an interest in its work to attend.  Click LEARN MORE HERE for a full schedule and previous meeting’s minutes.

(CHW Help in ) Creating a System of Health

Creating a System of Health

Forging collaborations between public health and healthcare is something I’m passionate about. Through my work in the hospital sector, health departments, and now at PHI, I’ve dedicated most of my career to finding the synergies that build community health.

For this month’s PHI50 celebration, I asked PHI leaders and board members to share their thoughts on this important direction. Eduardo Sanchez, deputy chief medical officer of the American Heart Association, said: “The opportunity over the next 50 years is bridging medical care and public health into what should be considered the health system for all Americans.”

PHI is helping to build that bridge. We’re advancing the role of Community Health Workers to connect medical care with social supports and community advocacy. We’ve helped non-profit hospitals invest their community benefit funds to proactively address community health needs, not just provide charity care. We’re leading the way in expanding the smart use of telehealth to achieve the Triple Aim in California. Visit our timeline and read this month’s PHI50 blog for more about PHI’s work.

Of course PHI is not alone–it takes all of us to create healthier populations. In my work with the Institute of Medicine, the Let’s Get Healthy California Taskforce, and the California State Innovation Model, I see unprecedented momentum and commitment from virtually every sector–from foundations to local businesses, academic institutions to insurers.

It’s an exciting–and demanding–time. What do you think it will take to build a true system of health, together? We’re reflecting your ideas on Facebook and Twitter with #PHI50.


Mary A. Pittman,
President and CEO
Public Health Institute

CHW~LINK 8. 18. 2014

CHW~LINK 8. 18. 2014

“Call for Abstracts”

Dear Colleagues,

Please circulate the attached “Call for Abstracts” for papers to be included in a Special Community Health Worker Issue of the Journal of Ambulatory Care Management scheduled for release in 2015.

Abstracts for papers are due on or by September 15, 2014; papers invited for submission will be due on December 31, 2014.

We look forward to your submissions.

Sincerely,  Issue Editors

E. Lee Rosenthal, Lee.Rosenthal@uth.tmc.edu  and  Noelle Wiggins, ninanoelia@msn.com or Journal Editor, Norbert Goldfieldnigoldfield@mmm.com 

Journal link: http://journals.lww.com/ambulatorycaremanagement/pages/default.aspx

Request for CHW Photos:

The CDC Division of Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention has committed to a revision and upgrading of the 2011 e-learning series, “Promoting Policy and Systems Change to Expand Employment of Community Health Workers (CHWs).” 

It is located at http://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/pubs/chw_elearning.htm, and is also now accessible through the PH TRAIN education portal.  We are also working on obtaining CEU approval for various professions.

In addition to general updates to reflect current practice, we have asked leaders in MA and MN to provide updates to the content of the case studies on their policy change experience in Module 6.

YOU CAN HELP: we need to obtain photos for the revised version that more accurately reflect CHWs – the company which produced the slide show used stock photos due to time pressure, and many of them frankly do not look like CHWs.  Candid photos of CHWs at work are preferable.  I estimate we will need at least 50 new photos.  We must have documentation that individuals in the photos have signed media releases, and any copyrighted material must include legal permission for CDC to reproduce it.  Again, I can’t guarantee that any specific photo will end up in the final version, but I will make every effort to credit the sources of all photos.

Please email questions and /or photos to Carl Rush  carl@chrllc.net

Download Resource:   2014 NCHWAS.pdf

– See more at: http://chwcentral.org/national-community-health-worker-advocacy-survey-report#sthash.oRBbyNTj.dpuf

Topics in Healthcare Symposium: Leveraging Community Resources to Improve Patient Health

California Quality Collaborative

Wednesday, October 8, 2014 from 8:00 AM to 1:00 PM (PDT)

Los Angeles, CA

Register for Event : https://www.eventbrite.com/e/topics-in-healthcare-symposium-leveraging-community-resources-to-improve-patient-health-tickets-12159807311

CQC is pleased to present a half-day lecture and discussion driven event on how to improve coordinated care through the understanding of social determinants of health, the Upstreamist Model, and Community Health Worker programs.

The determinants of health – in addition to a patient’s behavior and access to medicine –are comprised of the social, economic, and physical environment in which patients live. Understanding what social determinants of health are will help organizations better coordinate care.

Join us for a keynote speech by Dr. Rishi Manchanda, physician, author of “The Upstream Doctors” and founder of HealthBegins. The Upstreamist model, a phrase coined by Dr. Manchanda, involves the idea that most patients engage healthcare once they are sick. Dr. Manchanda poses the proposition that healthcare organizations need to identify the environmental factors that affect patients in their daily lives before illness as a way of moving “upstream” in the patient’s healthcare engagement.

Maria Lemus of Vision y Compromiso (VyC), will then present community health worker (CHW) programs. Community Health Workers, as members of the community who bridge the gap between patients in the community and healthcare providers, can have a tremendous impact on the communities that they serve. CHWs often offer a bridge between cultures or languages, allow for hard-to-reach communities to be more easily accessed as they build trust and strong relationships within their communities. Maria and VyC will provide resources, guidance, and examples of how medical groups can get involved and benefit from a CHW program.
Speakers

Dr. Rishi Manchanda – physician, author of “The Upstream Doctors” and founder of HealthBegins, will set the stage with the topic of social determinants of health. The reality is behavior is only a small factor in determining patients’ health – environment where patients live, work and spend their time are an enormous part of the equation of health.

After understanding how to improve outcomes by moving upstream in patients’ care, Maria Lemus, Executive Director of Vision y Compromiso speaks about the role that community health worker programs in engaging communities – particularly focused on the intersection of medical groups and diabetes programs – and the major models of community health worker programs. Vision y Compromiso is a resource and advocacy organization which provides resources for promotoras (as Community Health Workers are known in the Latino community).

How does this affect my organization?

Medical groups who are want to consider new ideas and better understand how to serve the patients in their communities benefit from learning about the Upstreamist model – the idea that healthcare providers can reach patients even before they are unwell. Additionally, a Community Health Worker program is one strategy for groups to consider when examining the benefits that CHWs have on cardiovascular health and diabetes prevention.

CQC’s Topics in Healthcare Symposium are single subject programs which introduce dynamic, exciting topics deserving of further exploration around their applicability to medical group, health plan and clinic staff. What are some of the major considerations around these concepts? CQC has invited physicians, public policy advocates, authors, and organizers to speak – so stay tuned for future meetings.

In 2014, CQC kicked off the Symposium series in June with Outpatient Palliative Care & Readmissions in Anaheim and will present Leveraging Community Resources to Improve Patient Health in October.

In January 2015, CQC will revisit the subject on Outpatient Palliative Care, focusing on palliative care in the non-end-of-life setting in the Northern California region.
Agenda

8:00 am – 9:00 am Breakfast and Registration

9:00 – 12:00 pm Speaker Sessions

12:00 – 1:00 pm Lunch & Networking

 

Who should attend?

Who should attend? Medical group and clinic staff who are looking at new ways to improve diabetes measures to better reach the community and impact population health would benefit most from this education, as well as those healthcare professionals who want to better understand social determinants of health and some of its major concepts.

Additionally, this event has a particular focus for all those responsible for quality improvement metrics and programs:

 

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