Post Prison Health Worker

Transitions Clinic Network

 What is the Transitions Clinic Network?

In 2011, Transitions Clinic received funding from the Langeloth Foundation to create and support a network of clinics nationally that serve returning prisoners with chronic illnesses.

The Transitions Clinic Network currently serves 24 communities across the country. Our partners are diverse and span the country from California (see below) to New York, even including Puerto Rico.

Ron Sanders, CHW and a TCN patient

Transitions Clinic patient with Ron Sanders, CHW

 

What We Do

Capacity Building:

  • Training for Primary Care Providers.
  • Training for Community Health Workers.
  • Training in Team-Based Care Utilizing CHWs
  • Supports creation and dissemination of relevant best practices.

Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR) and Evaluation Support:

 

  • Individualized needs assessments.
  • Tools for data collection and evaluation.
  • Training of Community Health Workers in CBPR.

We really appreciate all of your support and donations. Please continue to support the Transitions Clinic Network in 2014!

TRANSITIONS CLINIC
1855 Folsom St.
Room 520
San Francisco, CA 94103
General Tel: (415) 476-2148
Email: info@transitionsclinic.org

CHW Spotlight: Martha Shearer is a CHW (Post Prison Health Worker) in Birmingham, Alabama

“Despite holding two master’s degrees, I was fired from my last job after two and half years because my criminal background check finally came back.”… “I was devastated….Martha Shearer is a community health worker (CHW) at the Transitions Clinic in Birmingham, Alabama…. “I’ve been working for Transitions Clinic for a little over a year,” Martha recalls, “and through my position as a community health worker, I’ve been able to develop a ‘common relationship’ with my clients and assist them in their transition out of prison…Despite the challenges, Martha is optimistic. Her clients keep their appointments, which is often half the battle – and follow their medication regimen as outlined by the Transitions Clinic physician. “The model is working, says Martha, we just need to give them a chance.”   http://www.transitionsclinic.org/about.html

City College of San Francisco  Post-Prison Health Worker Specialty Certificate 

The curriculum for the Post-Prison Health Worker certificate is designed to prepare individuals for positions working with incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people in community health and social services agencies and programs. It emphasizes specific competencies for working with incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people such as culturally responsive outreach, case management, client-centered intake and counseling skills and community organizing and advocacy. As part of their education, students will complete an internship with a local agency serving incarcerated and/or formerly incarcerated people. The Post-Prison Health Worker Certificate requires successful completion of 20-23 units.
Learning Outcomes
In addition to the student learning objectives described in the Community Health Worker Program, students completing the specialty Post-Prison
Health Worker Certificate Program will also be able to:

  • Describe and analyze the historical development of the U.S. criminal justice system including; prison system conditions, culture of prison life, the political and economic roots, and their implications for poor communities and communities of color.
  • Examine and summarize the health impacts of incarceration including health inequities and common chronic diseases on the health and well-being of families and communities.
  • Examine and identify the challenges and systemic barriers to reentry an incarcerated person faces when re-entering society.
  • Assess and apply prevention-based models of criminal justice that promote health and safety.
  • Define and analyze the role of Community Health Workers and Medical Assistants in the management of chronic conditions including application of the ecological model, concepts of scope of practice, working as part of a clinical team and ethics.
  • Conduct culturally sensitive client-centered counseling and document client-action plans to patients with chronic conditions with special considerations for seniors and those formerly incarcerated.

Courses Required for the Certificate of Accomplishment as a Post-Prison Health Worker Certificate Program
Course Units
HLTH 60* CHW Skills ………………………………………………….. 3
HLTH 62* Prep for Field Experience
or HLTH 201* CHW Principles & Practice 1 …………….2-5
HLTH 61* CHW Field: Health Services …………………………. 3
HLTH 63* CHW Field Experience ………………………………… 2
HLTH 66 Health Education and Chronic
Disease Management ………………………………………………….. 3
HLTH 110 Health Impacts of Incarceration ………………….. 3
HLTH 116 Conflict Resolution ………………………………………. 1
Students must complete three (3) units from the following list of electives:
HLTH 10 Health and Aging ………………………………………….. 3
HLTH 25 Women’s Health Issues …………………………………. 3
HLTH 27 Men’s Health Issues ………………………………………. 3
HLTH 38 Trauma Response and Recovery……………………. 3
HLTH 54 Introduction to Public Health ……………………….. 3
HLTH 64 Health Education Practice …………………………….. 3
HLTH 65 Youth Development and Leadership……………… 3
HLTH 67 HIV/STI Prevention Education ……………………… 3
HLTH 90B Harm Reduction and Health……………………… 0.5
HLTH 91C Hepatitis ABCs…………………………………………….. 1
HLTH 95 Transgender Health:
Clients & Communities………………………………………………. 1
HLTH 96 Transgender Hlth: Public Health Strategies……. 2
HLTH 97 Health & Stress in Society ………………………………. 3
MABS 60 Intro to Comp Appl for Business……………………. 3
Total Units…………………………………………………………….. 20
*Note: HLTH 60 (3 units) and HLTH 62 (2 units) are taken concurrently or alternately HLTH 201 (5 units) in the first semester. HLTH 61 (3 units)
and HLTH 63 (2 units) are taken concurrently in the second semester.

142nd APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition (November 15 - November 19, 2014): http://www.apha.org/meetings/annual

Abstract 300054 Training CHWs online to work with formerly incarcerated communities in primary care settings  Monday, November 17, 2014 : 2:30 PM – 2:50 PM
Alma Avila, MPH , Health Education Department, City College of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA and Martha Shearer , Division of Preventive Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL

City College of San Francisco (CCSF) and Transitions Clinic Network (TCN) received a national innovation award through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Innovations to train and employ formerly incarcerated community health workers (CHWs) in primary care clinics serving recently released prisoners.  The collaborative aims to improve access to quality care for formerly incarcerated patients – an underserved population at high risk for chronic illness and death – and promote formerly incarcerated CHWs as a certified workforce.

CCSF adapted a 20-year old CHW certificate program for online delivery to train TCN CHWs. The curricula is based on the CCSF-developed textbook Foundations for Community Health Workers. A new online facilitator’s guide based on this curricula is under development and will be discussed.

CHWs from Transitions Clinics across the country and in Puerto Rico have been taking online classes since August of 2012. This presentation will showcase the online curricula and highlight several pedagogical features, including the use of video demonstrations of CHW core competencies, student discussion forums, and performance based assessments. The presentation will illustrate the rationale for the TCN model and need for primary care clinics specializing in treating patients coming home from prison.  All TCN clinics hire CHWs with a history of incarceration and include them as integral members of the primary care team.

The presentation will be co-facilitated by City College faculty and a TCN CHW who was trained through the online curricula. 

Learning Areas:
  • Chronic disease management and prevention
  • Diversity and culture
  • Implementation of health education strategies, interventions and programs
  • Planning of health education strategies, interventions, and programs

Learning Objectives: Explain the challenges and successes of adapting an in-person CHW certificate program for online delivery. Discuss the importance of providing culturally relevant training and quality primary care to formerly incarcerated communities. Demonstrate the significance of hiring formerly incarcerated people as CHWs to work with clients and communities impacted by mass incarceration.

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Abstract: Background

Re-entry community health workers (CHWs) are individuals who connect diverse community residents at risk for chronic health issues such as Hepatitis C virus and cardiovascular disease with post-prison healthcare and re-entry services. While the utilization of CHWs has been documented in other marginalized populations, there is little knowledge surrounding the work of re-entry CHWs with individuals released from incarceration. Specifically, CHWs’ experiences and perceptions of the uniqueness of their efforts to link individuals to healthcare have not been documented systematically. This study explored what is meaningful to formerly incarcerated CHWs as they work with released individuals